Press

  • SHARING HER WORLD VIEW

    PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

    (Klatchko’s) mission is to teach children that America is not a world unto itself.

    That children living in the rain forests of Borneo or desert caves in Australia or quaint villages in France have many of the same dreams, fears and chores as kids in America. That they have a lot in common, and yet, in some ways, nothing at all.

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  • THE ONE-PLANET SCHOOLHOUSE

    EDUTOPIA MAGAZINE (George Lucas Educational Foundation)
    For one veteran photographer, all the world’s a learning experience.“I believe in the power of story,” says (J. Sara) Klatchko, an award-winning photojournalist who lived abroad for twenty-one years. And no wonder: Everywhere she goes, she encounters children whose lives make for great stories.Ian, for instance, lives in a cave in the arid Australian Outback, and Lanau gets to school in Borneo by boat.

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  • DEVELOPING WORLD

    BUCKS COUNTY COURIER TIMES
    The world is one big story, humanity linked in twisting latitudes and longitudes of narrative — plots and subplots and histories, chronicles and sagas and epics.

    This is Joan ‘Sara’ Klatchko’s territory. She is a reporter-at-large on very large subjects, to which she brings a gift for drawing the finest points from the smallest subjects.

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  • KLATCHKO'S VISION : CHANGING THE WORLD ONE IMAGE AT A TIME

    UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS MAGAZINE
    (Klatchko) has been everywhere. She’s a photographer. Mostly of kids. She’s done that in North, Central and South America, Africa, Europe, china…Asia…most of the habitable space on Earth. …”I wanted to use photography to make a difference,” she recalls. “I used to get fired up thinking how photography had the power to change the world….”

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  • MAK'S WORLD

    BUCKS COUNTY COURIER TIMES
    Seven year-old Mak was at the temple in town with her aunt’s family when the tsunami hit.  Everyone who was at the temple survived, her uncle said, fixing his squid trap. “And everyone who didn’t, died,” he added, a bit unnecessarily. On that day, Mak lost her parents, and 7-month old brother, and most of her relatives.

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  • AYE’S STORY

    BUCKS COUNTY COURIER TIMES
    ‘Aye’ means cool and peaceful, a fitting name for a child whose life is defined by water and flowers. In a household of seven people, six year-old Aye is the youngest – and luckiest. Her father – like most Burmese farmers, grows rice during the monsoon, and struggles to irrigate his flower crop during the dry months.

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